Day 15 – Avenue of the Giants, One Log House, Glass Beach & Lighthouse

Avenue of the Giants, One Log House, Glass Beach & Lighthouse
The Avenue of the Giants is a scenic highway in Northern California, U.S.A., running through Humboldt Redwoods State Park. It is an old alignment of U.S. Route 101, and continues to be maintained by the state as State Route 254. The highway is notable for the Coast Redwoods that overshadow the road and surround the area. It is from these towering trees that the Avenue of the Giants takes its name. The road winds alongside the scenic Eel River, and connects several small towns such as Phillipsville, Miranda, Myers Flat, Burlington, Weott, Englewood, Redcrest and Pepperwood. The two-lane road has a number of parking areas, picnic sites, and attractions for visitors. The nearby river provides many excellent swimming locations, such as those at the Rockefeller Forest redwood grove.
Being situated just off a major highway, and having attained some degree of international fame, the Avenue has many attractions for visitors, both natural and human-made.
 
Along the Avenue of the Giants,  we stopped to take a look at this nice truck.

 

 

————————————————————

Down the road you will reach a pit stop where you can take a look inside and out the One Log House for a minimal fee of $1.

Hollowed out in 1946 from a single log, the Famous One-Log House was created from a redwood tree over 2100 years old! This section alone weighed 42 tons. It took two men eight months of hard labor to hollow out a room 7 feet high and 32 feet long. Enough chips came out of it to build a five-bedroom house! This special log home includes living, dining, & bedroom areas just like any other trailer or motor home.

This Northern California redwood attraction has been a longtime popular attraction to young and old alike. Another amazing thing about this “house” is that its actually on wheels. Art Schmock, the creator, intended to have it tour across the country but ran into problems because of its size so it rested in Clam Beach for a time, then the town of Leggett for 25 years, and then twenty-three years in Phillipsville. Ready to travel again, it moved in 1999 to its current home on US Highway 101 just south of Garberville near Richardson’s Grove State Park just on the edge of the Humboldt county/Mendocino county line.

 

 Back on the road… excited to arrive at Glass Beach, Fort Bragg. I did a little homework about the Glass Beach, and that caught my curiosity and wanted to see.

Glass Beach is a beach in MacKerricher State Park near Fort Bragg, California that is abundant in sea glass created from years of dumping garbage into an area of coastline near the northern part of the town. In the early 1900s, Fort Bragg residents threw their household garbage over cliffs owned by the Union Lumber Company onto what is now Glass Beach, discarding glass, appliances, and even vehicles. Locals referred to it as “The Dumps.” Fires were lit to reduce the size of the trash pile.

The California State Water Resources Control Board and city leaders closed the area in 1967. Various cleanup programs were undertaken through the years to correct the damage. Over the next several decades the pounding waves cleaned the beach, by breaking down everything but glass and pottery and tumbling those into the small, smooth, colored pieces that cover Glass Beach.

There are three Glass Beach sites in Fort Bragg where trash was dumped into ocean between 1906 and 1967. Glass Beach Site Two and Three (1943-1949) are located at the end of the path that begins on the corner of Elm Street and Glass Beach Drive. These sites are accessible by foot and by a short climb down the cliffs surrounding the beach. Site One (1906-1943) is located south of Sites One and Two and can only be accessed by water because there is no trespassing on the cliffs above the cove.

In 1998, the private owner of the property determined that Glass Beach should belong to the public, and began a five year process of working with the California Coastal Conservancy and the California Integrated Waste Management Board for the cleanup and sale of the property to the state. Following completion of the clean up, the California Department of Parks and Recreation purchased the 38-acre. Glass Beach property, and it was incorporated into MacKerricher State Park in October 2002.

The beach is now frequently visited by tourists.Most collect some glass. Because of this and also because of natural factors, the glass is slowly diminishing.

 

The Point Cabrillo Lighthouse complex is located about 1.5 miles north of Mendocino, California, and includes the lighthouse itself together with several outbuildings. Most of the original structures remain, but the barn is missing: in 1986 it was destroyed in a fire department exercise. The remaining lighthouse station is “one of the most complete light stations in the United States”.
Atop the lighthouse spins a third order Fresnel lens with four panels containing 90 lead glass prisms and weighing 6800 pounds, constructed by Chance Brothers, an English company, and shipped to Point Cabrillo around Cape Horn. The light is only 32 feet above the ground, but because of the height of the headlands it stands 81 feet above sea level. It was originally lit by a kerosene lamp and turned by a clockwork mechanism but this was replaced by an electric light and motor in 1935. The present light uses a single 1000-watt electric filament, the light from which is magnified by a factor of one thousand by the lens, and spins once every 40 seconds producing a flash every 10 seconds.
We spent the night in Petaluma, California, and will continue our journey back home.
stamp03

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s